Glassboro Fire Department
Station 26-1

Fire Safety

Each year, hundreds of people are killed or injured and millions of dollars lost in property damage as a result of fire. Most of these are preventable tragedies that could have been avoided with the knowledge of a few simple fire safety tips. It is imperative that parents teach their children early, so that they may continue safe habits into adulthood. October is Fire Prevention month, but the following safety tips should be taught and practiced throughout the year.


Smoke and CO Detectors

  • There should be one in each bedroom, in hallways and in basements
  • There should be at least one CO detector on each floor
  • Test the batteries once a month to ensure proper function
  • Change batteries twice a year (when you change your clocks, change the batteries!)
  • Replace smoke detectors every 8-10 years and CO detectors every 5 years

Fire Extinguishers

  • Keep fire extinguishers handy—in your kitchen, garage and in your car. These should also be checked monthly to ensure proper operation in the event they are needed.
  • Make sure you know the types of fire extinguishers and how to use each type. You don't want to learn in an emergency!
  • Click on the picture below to learn about the types of fire extinguishers and the types of fires for which they are used!

Have a Plan

Make sure all family members know what to do in the event of a fire. Draw a floor plan with at least one means of escape from every room.  Develop a plan for each floor. Make sure the plan shows the important details—stairs, hallways and windows that can be used as fire escape routes. Click on the picture below to make your own family fire escape plan!

 

Choose a Meeting Place

Choose a safe meeting place outside the house. This will make it easy to account for everyone and you will be able to quickly inform arriving firefighters in the event someone is missing.

Other Safety Tips

  • It is a good idea to keep a flashlight in each bedroom.
  • Always sleep with the bedroom doors closed. While children may not like this, it will keep deadly heat and smoke out of bedrooms, providing additional escape time during a fire emergency.
  • Find a way for everyone to sound a family alarm. Yelling, pounding on walls, whistles, etc. Practice yelling "FIRE!"
  • During a fire, time is critical. Don't waste time getting dressed, don't search for pets or valuables, just get out!
  • Roll out of bed. Stay low. One breath of smoke or gases may be enough to incapacitate you.
  • Feel all doors before opening them. If a door is hot, find another way out.
  • Learn to stop, drop to the ground and roll if clothes catch fire. 
  • Post emergency numbers near telephones! Be aware that if a fire threatens your home, you should not place the call to emergency services from inside the home. It is better to get out and place the call to fire authorities from a safe location outside the house.

A Word About Heaters and Lights

  • Space heaters need space! Keep portable and space heaters at least 3 feet from anything that may burn. Never leave heaters on when you leave home or go to sleep. Children and pets should always be kept away from them.
  • Be careful of halogen lights! If you have halogen lights (which are very popular among college students), make sure they are away from flammable drapes and low ceiling areas. Never leave them on when you leave your home or office.

Smokers Beware!

Smokers need to be extra careful! Never smoke in bed or when you are tired. Carelessly discarded cigarettes are a leading cause of fire deaths in the United States!

Matches and Lighters are Dangerous

In the hands of a child, matches and lighters can be very dangerous! Store them where kids cannot reach them, preferably in a locked area. Teach children that matches and lighters are "tools" and should only be used by adults.